The Silver Lining

The most ingenious prisoner of war in Stalag XXA (Germany) was an Australian, Lance-Corporal A- Lewis, who made himself a set of false  teeth with melted down “silver paper”. This was revealed by a British prisoner’s letter published in the “Daily Mail,” which stated: “Lewis, by common consent, gets all the silver paper from the cigarette packets and chocolates received in prisoners’ parcels. He melts it down, and by pouring it in moulds supplies the men with first-class reproductions of regimental badges.”

Source: Morning Bulletin, Mon 8 Feb, 1943

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What a Shocker!

Trials were made in London with an apparatus for the extraction
of teeth by electricity!
 The apparatus consisted of an induction-coil of extremely fine wire, having an interrupter that could vibrate at the rate of 450 times a second. The patient sat in the traditional arm chair and took the negative electrode in his left hand, and the positive in his right. At this moment, the operator turned on a current whose intensity was gradually increased till it had attained the utmost limit that the patient could support. The extractor was then put in circuit and fastened on the tooth, which under the action of the vibrations, loosened at once.
Source: The Kadina and Wallaroo Times, Sat 22 Jun 1895

Love and Marriage

An elderly couple boarded a tram at Belmont. Suddenly the woman exclaimed: “Dad!.,You
haven’t got your teeth!” Dad touched his mouth to make sure. “It’s your fault,” he said, “letting me come out in public without my teeth.” He pulled the bell cord. “Surely  you don’t hold your wife responsible for putting your teeth in before going out?” asked a fellow passenger. “Certainly, I do. She has a good look at me before I leave home. She’d soon notice it if I went out without my trousers. Of course, its her fault; she should see I have my teeth in before I go out!
Source: The Charleville Times, Thu 11 June, 1953

Bullion Bulldog

An English bulldog sitting in a car on Washington Street, Indianapolis, attracted considerable attention with a generous display of gold teeth!
By reason of the open face construction peculiar to this breed of dog, the gold fang was especially prominent and fairly glistened in the sunlight. There was other wealth in the dog’s mouth besides this, for she had four back teeth of the valuable metal. Despite these adornments, the dog of aristrocratic breeding, was not at all proud, but looked about in a casual way, as though mildly interested n the persons who were keenly interested in her.

A resident of Molotou, on the Dorrigo, had his artificial teeth stolen by a black magpie . While the man was at work, he removed his new set of artificial teeth, which had been troubling him and placed them on a nearby log. Presently a magpie swooped down and flew off with them to a high tree and proceeded to try and break them against a dead limb. A gun was secured, but the shot failed, and the bird, still clutching the teeth in its beak, flew away with the owner of them in pursuit. It was not long before both bird and teeth were lost to light in a thickly-wooded gully! • The Sydney Morning Herald, Fri 24 Dec 1926